It Takes a Village: Cheetah Conservation and Land Management

by Jameson Bowman, guest writer Cheetahs live in low densities over vast areas. On average, male cheetahs require 800 square miles – an area larger than Toronto – and need abundant wildlife. Throughout Africa, protected land is limited and cheetahs roam onto private lands.  Due to their unique needs, cheetahs require an alternative method for conservation.

Cheetah Diplomacy – a requirement for conservation to succeed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer (based on presentation delivered by Dr. Laurie Marker, April 17, 2019, Ottawa) “Saving the cheetah isn’t just about saying, aren’t you pretty and you should live, it’s making a world for the cheetah”, said Dr. Laurie Marker, Founder and Executive Director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF), as she concluded her

The Cheetah Inner Ear is Built to Handle Speed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer When we think of cheetah adaptations, we think of a body built for speed: slim body, long legs and a flexible spine that allows them to extend their stride. With cheetahs reaching speeds as fast as 110 km/hr, speed could be a liability if it wasn’t for special adaptations that

Cheetahs need to run regularly

To ensure CCF non-releasable cheetahs get the exercise that they need , CCF runs them regularly using a mechanical lure system. It’s very important for their physical and mental health. This video is a compilation of clips from Brigitte Petraz, volunteer in France, shot during her visits to CCF since 2010.  The video was edited

Children are stepping up!

We are so please when we receive letters, e-mails and pictures from Canadian children letting us now about their passion for the cheetah.  Many of them have celebrated their birthday in honour of the cheetah and raised money for the cause.  We encourage children to be advocates in their schools and explain to their classmates

Growing support from Canadians for the survival of the cheetah!

Over the past 5 years, Canadians have donated close to $425,000 to key programs run by Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia.   Our Canadian charity run solely by volunteers and is proud to be directing 98% of all donations directly to Namibia. The next 15 years are critical to the survival of the cheetah in

Canadian Donors Help Student Interns’ Learning Experience

CCF’s student intern program provides outstanding opportunities for students to deepen their learning and practical experience in a wide range of disciplines, including biology, animal science, genetics, and conservation. Students working on under-graduate and graduate degrees complete their research projects at the Centre while benefitting from CCF’s extensive staff expertise.  As well, CCF has a

What is the Key to Cheetah Cubs’ Survival?

Cheetah cubs need to be with their mother until they are fully grown to survive as adults! by Jameson Bowman, guest writer Female cheetahs are solitary creatures where males and females only coming together to mate. When a female and male mate, they spend 2-3 days copulating multiple times. Once impregnated, the female returns to her solitary

Why is the Cheetah Threatened? What are the Solutions?

Learn more about the threats, importance of saving the cheetah and some solutions supported by Canadians.  

The spotted, the spotless, the stripes and the blotched

by Meredith Hanel, Guest writer When we think of spotted animals, cheetahs are probably one of the first to come to mind. This defining feature is in the name cheetah, thought to be derived from the Hindu word chita for “spotted one”. Cheetahs have about 2000 spots and each has a unique pattern that can be