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It Takes a Village: Cheetah Conservation and Land Management

by Jameson Bowman, guest writer Cheetahs live in low densities over vast areas. On average, male cheetahs require 800 square miles – an area larger than Toronto – and need abundant wildlife. Throughout Africa, protected land is limited and cheetahs roam onto private lands.  Due to their unique needs, cheetahs require an alternative method for conservation.

Cheetah Diplomacy – a requirement for conservation to succeed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer (based on presentation delivered by Dr. Laurie Marker, April 17, 2019, Ottawa) “Saving the cheetah isn’t just about saying, aren’t you pretty and you should live, it’s making a world for the cheetah”, said Dr. Laurie Marker, Founder and Executive Director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF), as she concluded her

The spotted, the spotless, the stripes and the blotched

by Meredith Hanel, Guest writer When we think of spotted animals, cheetahs are probably one of the first to come to mind. This defining feature is in the name cheetah, thought to be derived from the Hindu word chita for “spotted one”. Cheetahs have about 2000 spots and each has a unique pattern that can be

Canadians for Cheetahs!

Saving the cheetah is very important to Canadians across our big country. In British Columbia, Marializ is one of our generous supporters. Her passion for cheetahs is matched by her commitment to helping ensure that they are protected from extinction. Marializ says that she was “drawn to cheetahs, with their physicality, power and speed, while

News from the Field: Update for Release Candidates 

3 males – Cyclone, Kamin, Elwood On 18 March 2018, our three male release candidates were released from their enclosure onto CCF property. Upon release, the three males were fed an entire red hartebeest carcass just outside the gates of the enclosure to give them one last guaranteed meal before having to rely more on

What’s the difference between cheetahs and other Big Cats?

By Jan Robertson,  Guest writer The difference between cheetahs and other Big Cats is, first and foremost, the cheetah is not a Big Cat, in the Latin sense of the word. Top 10 Largest Wild Cats When many people think of the genus Panthera, more commonly known as Big Cats, we think of lions, tigers,

Why should Canadians care about wildlife in Southern Africa?

Cheetah Cub - Blog

Why should Canadians care about wildlife in Southern Africa? Because the loss of cheetahs & other wildlife will be felt not only in Africa, but around the world.

Happy Valentine’s Day 2016

Show your love for cheetahs on Valentine’s Day! By donating today, you can help us care for cheetahs in Namibia and to try to reverse the downward trend of the number of cheetahs in the wild. For more blog posts, click here.

What Does the Future Hold for Cheetahs?

Dr. Laurie Marker in London Ontario, conservationist and world renowned cheetah expert.

Annual General Meeting, January 18, 2014 (via teleconference) Question 7: With all your experience, how best do you think you we can ensure we have good stewardship for the planet once the older generations pass on? Laurie:  I think we need to push government and push business to focus on this – and the people

Cheetahs in Care

Dr. Laurie Marker in London Ontario, conservationist and world renowned cheetah expert.

Annual General Meeting, January 18, 2014 (via teleconference) Question 2: How many cheetahs are under your care at the moment and how many will you be able to release in the future? Laurie:  We presently have 44 cheetahs in our care. Unfortunately, we lost a cheetah named Shadow just yesterday (January 17th, 2014) and although

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