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How Conserving Cheetahs Helps the Planet,

and Why Canadians Should Care. by Amy Cocksedge, guest writer Cheetahs may be the fastest animal on the planet, but they cannot run away from the fact that there are less than 7,500 left in the wild. This low population number classifies them as a vulnerable species. Their population is declining due to loss of

The Year of the Livestock Guarding Dog Coming to a Close

Marking twenty-five years of success for farmers and cheetahs! by Meredith Hanel, guest writer As eighty percent of cheetahs in Namibia share land with farmers, there are bound to be conflicts. When Laurie Marker arrived in the late eighties, she talked to farmers and learned they viewed killing cheetahs and other predators as necessary to protect

Cats, dogs and robots built for speed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer When it comes to speed, the cheetah reigns. Crowned the fastest land animal, the cheetah can reach 110 km per hour. The fastest dog, the greyhound, can run about 70 km per hour. To find tune their bodies for speed, cheetahs have had 8.5 million years of natural selection and dogs

Spotlight on cheetahs in the illegal pet trade

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer “As long as there is a demand by the rich, creating a lucrative trade for the poor, the cheetah’s future hangs in the balance”. These words by CNN’s Jomana Karadsheh succinctly captured the crux of the matter in her story on cheetahs in the illegal pet tradein the Horn of Africa,

Cheetah Diplomacy – a requirement for conservation to succeed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer (based on presentation delivered by Dr. Laurie Marker, April 17, 2019, Ottawa) “Saving the cheetah isn’t just about saying, aren’t you pretty and you should live, it’s making a world for the cheetah”, said Dr. Laurie Marker, Founder and Executive Director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF), as she concluded her

The Cheetah Inner Ear is Built to Handle Speed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer When we think of cheetah adaptations, we think of a body built for speed: slim body, long legs and a flexible spine that allows them to extend their stride. With cheetahs reaching speeds as fast as 110 km/hr, speed could be a liability if it wasn’t for special adaptations that

2018 IMPACT Report

Just off the press – see CCF Namibia 2018 Annual Report. Canadians contributed to CCF Namibia close to $120,000 toward four programs: the livestock guarding dog program, cheetah care and education for farmers and future conservationists. We also had two generous donors who paid for the construction of a dorm at CCF Centre to accommodate

CHEETAH TRAFFICKING CRISIS IN HORN OF AFRICA

For Immediate Release CHEETAH CONSERVATION FUND WARNS CHEETAH TRAFFICKING CRISIS IN HORN OF AFRICA REACHING EPIDEMIC STATUS WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 4, 2019) – With 23 cubs intercepted from the illegal wildlife trade now under its care at its temporary shelter in Hargeisa, Somaliland, Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) warns the growing cheetah poaching crisis in the Horn of Africa

Children are stepping up!

We are so please when we receive letters, e-mails and pictures from Canadian children letting us now about their passion for the cheetah.  Many of them have celebrated their birthday in honour of the cheetah and raised money for the cause.  We encourage children to be advocates in their schools and explain to their classmates

Growing support from Canadians for the survival of the cheetah!

Over the past 5 years, Canadians have donated close to $425,000 to key programs run by Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia.   Our Canadian charity run solely by volunteers and is proud to be directing 98% of all donations directly to Namibia. The next 15 years are critical to the survival of the cheetah in