A WONDERFUL VISIT TO CCF

by Johanna Hickey, a CCF Canada supporter In November 2019, a small group of us from the West Coast of Canada had the privilege of visiting CCF Namibia. Our travel company, Royal Heights Travel, a small boutique family owned and operated firm in Victoria British Columbia had arranged the visit during our tour of Namibia.

How Conserving Cheetahs Helps the Planet,

and Why Canadians Should Care. by Amy Cocksedge, guest writer Cheetahs may be the fastest animal on the planet, but they cannot run away from the fact that there are less than 7,500 left in the wild. This low population number classifies them as a vulnerable species. Their population is declining due to loss of

The Year of the Livestock Guarding Dog Coming to a Close

Marking twenty-five years of success for farmers and cheetahs! by Meredith Hanel, guest writer As eighty percent of cheetahs in Namibia share land with farmers, there are bound to be conflicts. When Laurie Marker arrived in the late eighties, she talked to farmers and learned they viewed killing cheetahs and other predators as necessary to protect

Cats, dogs and robots built for speed

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer When it comes to speed, the cheetah reigns. Crowned the fastest land animal, the cheetah can reach 110 km per hour. The fastest dog, the greyhound, can run about 70 km per hour. To find tune their bodies for speed, cheetahs have had 8.5 million years of natural selection and dogs

Spotlight on cheetahs in the illegal pet trade

by Meredith Hanel, guest writer “As long as there is a demand by the rich, creating a lucrative trade for the poor, the cheetah’s future hangs in the balance”. These words by CNN’s Jomana Karadsheh succinctly captured the crux of the matter in her story on cheetahs in the illegal pet tradein the Horn of Africa,

Canadian Vet Students Pursue their Passion

By Alex Geduld-Boucher, Student Veterinarian, Class of 2021, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph The airplane wheels touched down on the Namibian runway, and slowly came to a halt. Andrew Bush and I disembarked from the small aircraft to see, somewhat surprisingly, the scale of the international airport in Windhoek. After spending 4 weeks travelling through South Africa